Saffron

Iranian Saffron known as the “red gold”, saffron is a magical ingredient in Persian culture, from aromatic foods and colorful desserts, to the physical and spiritual medicine. The expensive spice has long been a high-demand commodity and even triggered a war in 1374 in central Europe. But let’s take a closer look at saffron in Iran and see why you should keep it in your souvenir shopping list.

Our first priority is the distribution highest-quality products with the latest process of testing quality in the lab. Saffron in the Incoming Warehouse before any process on it in our laboratory are checked for all chemical and physical cases like their moisture, Crocin, Safranal and… We are synchronous with the latest test cases and certificates required in Asia, Europe, and the United States. By controlling on all stages, such as testing the quality of the saffron harvested from the farm until the process of sorting and packing saffron to the final product we try to do our responsibility against your health.

Benefits

The benefits of saffron may include:

Providing antioxidants

The majority of the health claims surrounding saffron relate to its high levels of specific antioxidants.

According to a 2015 review, the main active antioxidants include:

  • crocin
  • picrocrocin
  • safranal

Other compounds include kaempferol and crocetin.

These antioxidants help fight against oxidative stress and free radicals in the body.

As oxidative stress and free radicals play a role in the development of many health conditions, including cancer and heart disease, antioxidants such as these may help protect a person’s health.

Preventing nervous system disorders

The antioxidants in saffron may play a role in protecting the body from disorders affecting the nervous system.

Research from 2015 notes that compounds in saffron, such as crocin, appear to reduce inflammation and oxidative damage in the brain, which may lead to beneficial effects.

A study in the journal Antioxidants noted that saffron might theoretically help with Alzheimer’s symptoms due to both its memory-enhancing properties and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

People with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s who took saffron for 22 weeks had cognitive improvements that were comparable with those of people who took the drug donepezil, and they also experienced fewer side effects.

While this is early evidence to support the medicinal use of saffron, researchers suggested that future clinical trials could help back up these claims.

Benefits

The benefits of saffron may include:

Providing antioxidants

The majority of the health claims surrounding saffron relate to its high levels of specific antioxidants.

According to a 2015 review, the main active antioxidants include:

  • crocin
  • picrocrocin
  • safranal

Other compounds include kaempferol and crocetin.

These antioxidants help fight against oxidative stress and free radicals in the body.

As oxidative stress and free radicals play a role in the development of many health conditions, including cancer and heart disease, antioxidants such as these may help protect a person’s health.

Preventing nervous system disorders

The antioxidants in saffron may play a role in protecting the body from disorders affecting the nervous system.

Research from 2015 notes that compounds in saffron, such as crocin, appear to reduce inflammation and oxidative damage in the brain, which may lead to beneficial effects.

A study in the journal Antioxidants noted that saffron might theoretically help with Alzheimer’s symptoms due to both its memory-enhancing properties and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

People with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s who took saffron for 22 weeks had cognitive improvements that were comparable with those of people who took the drug donepezil, and they also experienced fewer side effects.

While this is early evidence to support the medicinal use of saffron, researchers suggested that future clinical trials could help back up these claims.

Promoting weight loss

There is also some evidence to suggest that saffron may help promote weight loss and curb the appetite.

A study in the Journal of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Research found that taking a saffron extract helped people with coronary artery disease reduce their body mass index (BMI), total fat mass, and waist circumference.

People who took the supplement also had a reduced appetite compared with those in the placebo group.

How to use it

One simple way to supplement a meal with saffron is to add a few strands to a cup of hot water. Doing this pulls most of the flavor from the saffron. A person can then add both the water and saffron to a savory dish at the end of cooking.

Saffron is also becoming more available as a supplement, generally in the form of powdered stigmas in capsules. It is important to read the instructions on the packaging and speak to a doctor before taking any new supplements.